10 responses to “What's new in dyslipidemia”

  1. It is encouraging that the message is getting out to the general population of family physicians that it is the small dense particle that is of importance to cardiovascular health that is not picked up by the usual
    lipid profile whereas apoB is more predictive.
    thanks for the concise review

  2. SHEDS LIGHT ON THE APO B CONTROVERSY AND RECENT META ANALYSIS.
    FOR FURTHER STUDY AND POSSIBLY CHANGE MY PRACTICE WITHIN THE NEXT MONTH

  3. Reinforces that apo b is the appropriate target to measure.

  4. Very usaful to read an academic artcle. Will be useful

  5. I don’t think apo B levels are a covered by the medical services plan in BC.

  6. A recent BCMJ article suggests # needed to treat of 1/152 for framingham < 20%. Are aggressive guidelines really making a difference?

  7. Apo-b has for some time now been a usefull tool for screening purposes in especially high risk familial hyperlipidemias.

  8. ApoB test is covered in B.C.

    The efficacy of statin in primary prevention depends on the patient’s global risk.It is indeed low in those without any major risk factors.

  9. In regard to the comment on payments for apoB: Yes,this test is paid for in B.C.(unlike many other provinces).

    Comment on usefulness of statins in primary prevention: The efficacy of statin in primary prevention depends on the patient’s global risk-it’s very low in people with no major risk factors and high in those in high risk category. Thus-as usual-clinical judgment is important.

  10. I have started using the apo B instead of LDL since this article initially came out

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